26 July, 2015

City Geomorphs (Part 2)

Here's a closer look at some of the work-in-progress geomorphs.


"Old Town" is the central and most established area of a city, it dates back to the 1800s or early 1900s when it was fashionable among town planners to lay things out on straight lines, north to south, east to west, regardless of the actual undulation of the terrain. There's an old cathedral in the middle of Old Town, which might once have been the centre of a thriving community, but now lies dwarfed by larger buildings that have also fallen into decay while the vibrancy of the city has moved to outer regions and suburbs. Between the decrepit buildings are dank and crime ridden alleyways, few people come to this part of the city anymore, except the occasional tourist who wants to get a feel for the way things used to be (they usually leave disappointed).


Most people catch the motorway and drive past this "Light Industrial Area" without giving it a second thought. They see warehouses and don't consider what secrets might be hidden in storage, they see  factories and don't wonder about the devices or consumables that might be made within. Areas like this are the lifeblood of the city, creating the trade goods that drive commerce, and providing income to thousands of workers. On the edges of this area are basic houses and apartment blocks typically home to the many workers who gain their livelihood from the factories and warehouses at the centre.


While the "Light Industrial Areas" might provide the livelihood for the city, "Medium Density Commercial Area" is home to shopping centres, cinemas, and the shining lights that show a thriving community. Sometimes these shining lights are honest signs of a vibrant community, sometimes they conceal a deep corruption and inequality between the working classes and those who control them through hypnotic advertising and lies of greatness through consumerism. These areas also provide an interface between the motorways and the regular streets, thus allowing citizens to quickly move from one commercial centre to the next.
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