20 August, 2014

A Guide to Geomorphs (Part 11)

One of my future posts has been pre-empted by the work of Keith J Davies. It's great to have been an inspiration to someone, and it's good to see things being taken further. I've got a lot of projects on my plate at the moment, so I can't churn out these tutorials as quickly as I might like, but it looks like Keith is generally on the same wavelength as me, especially over a few of the online conversations we've had in recent days.

I was going to leave it a bit further down the track, but I'll start looking at the actual drawing of geomorphs now. We've touched on edge types and phases for geomorph systems, but one of the key things about drawing geomorphs is making sure everything is consistent and lines up when the tiles are placed together.

I try to draw a single sheet of paper with one or more geomorph shapes on it (whether they be square or hexagonal), sometimes the geomorph will fill the page, but more often I try to get a few onto a single sheet. Each of these shapes is then marked with diagonals across the points, and often markings along the edges where roads (or rivers) might lead out of one geomorph and into the next.

With this master sheet, I trace a second sheet (or lightweight paper or tracing film) with the actual geomorphs. This way I know every geomorph will be consistent in its alignment.

Mine are typically hand done (with old school drawing board, set squares, compasses and mechanical pencil), and this can make for some mild inaccuracies. But since I usually draw at twice the reproduced size (and cutting out shapes often has a margin for error), these inaccuracies are negligible.

Keith has been kind enough to generate a few pages, typical of what I would draw up. I'm shamelessly stealing them from him to post here (but certainly giving credit to him). If I hadn't draw up some of my own sheets two nights ago, I'd probably just use these for drawing future geomorphs on.





(Keith's blog can be found here).
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