02 January, 2019

So bad it's almost decent

My nephew was given three games for Christmas.

He got a starter set for Warhammer 40k... that's going to be an expensive hobby for him if it takes hold.

He also got the D&D 5th edition starter set... which is also going to be an expensive hobby.

I'll probably get roped into runn9ng a few games of each. Since I've bern collecyinb miniatures for 25 years and have been roleplaying for about 30. I can see both of these games really hooking him if he gets the right crowd, but can also see him turning away if he has a couple of bad experiences. We'll see how things go.

It's the third game that I found surprising.

I despise Monopoly, and I've generally avoided Fortnite, but no one else wanted to play the game against my nephew so I took the hit for the team. I figured he'd get bored and I'd only end up wasting an hour or so.

The basic premise of the game follows some of the tropes of Monopoly, moving around the board, collecting properties, going to jail, collecting random cards that might be beneficial, etc.  But it also has elements where you can shoot other players if you're on the same side of the board, or build walls if the dice give you the opportunity. Also, instead of money you get character health which is depleted by various means, and replenished by far fewer.

It suffers from many of the standard issues of Monopoly where it's all about the dice, and strategy really doesn't play as part. It still sticks to the whole roll-and-move paradigm, but starts with the interesting idea that players can begin anywhere on the board. The gradually decreasing health scores mean that there is basically a built in timer for the game, so that's nice. I'd be interested to see how it played out with a few more players, rather than just a 1-on-1 fight. The fact that I'm willing to play it again firmly places it above virtually every other incarnation of Monopoly that I've encountered. It feels like it could be a good game if it weren't so tied to the shackles of the Monopoly framework, but that framework provides a common starting ground for people who get scared of things that aren't familiar.

So, not great, but I'd play it over any other version of Monopoly, or Cards Against Humanity.


Post a Comment