31 December, 2014

A Fox's Guide to Conlangs (Part 11) - Starting the Noun Lists

This is the slow part of the process, determining what the meanings of letter combinations represent, then trying to convert that combination of meanings to reflect a concept that would need to be conveyed by language.

Here's the first batch.

Proper Nouns – [N] a/A (Still thinking about these)

Common Concrete Countable Living Nouns – [K] o/O auoioe

The first batch of these generally represent types of people who come and go (thus explaining their “impermanence”). 

Koa 1 – Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary conception (baby)
Kou 2 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary invigoration (child)
Koo 3 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary maturation (young adult)
Koi 4 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary stagnation (old adult)
Koo 5 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary destruction (dying person)
Koe 6 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary oblivion (corpse before incineration/burial and returning to the cycle)
KoA 1 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal conception (artist/poet)
KoU 2 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal invigoration (farmer/craftsman)
KoO 3 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal maturation (merchant/courtier)
KoI 4 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal stagnation (noble/scholar)
KoO 5 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal destruction (warrior/hunter)
KoE 6 - Impermanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal oblivion (philosopher/thinker)

If we add the option of a final consonant sound, the raw form might represent a person, while the consonants might twist the meaning to represent the products produced by such people (“d”), animals which perform a similar role in the ecosystem (“k”), the discipline that such people engage in (“t”) or tools used in the function of this role (“n”). Thus [Koat] might be a generic term for a place where babies are born and [KoOn] might be a generic word for weapon.

The second batch of these generally represent animals which exist as general classes, individuals may come and go but the class of animals remains (thus explaining their “permanence”). 

KOa 1 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary conception (a plant/animal renowned for being cunning)
KOu 2 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary invigoration (a plant/animal renowned for being strong)
KOo 3 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary maturation (a plant/animal renowned for being tough)
KOi 4 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary stagnation (a plant/animal renowned for being toxic)
KOo 5 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary destruction (a plant/animal renowned for being poisonous)
KOe 6 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of momentary oblivion (a cryptozooid)
KOA 1 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal conception (an animal that produces a consumable)
KOU 2 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal invigoration (an animal used for work)
KOO 3 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal maturation (a predator)
KOI 4 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal stagnation (an animal that is consumed)
KOO 5 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal completion (a scavenger)
KOE 6 – Permanent common concrete countable living noun of eternal oblivion (a spirit/ethereal being)


If we add the option of a final consonant sound, the raw form might represent a general animal type, while the consonants might twist the meaning to represent the specific classes of animals that fulfil such functions. Animals of the sea (“d”), animals of the land (“k”), animals of the air (“t”) or plants (“n”). Thus [KOOd] might be a generic term for a shark or other aquatic predator and [KOin] might be a generic word for a toxic plant. 

I'm undecided about compressing double vowels where the two vowels identical. I'm leaning toward compression being the best option because these are meant to be single syllables. Also, don't be too concerned about how similar these words seem at this point, once we add prefixes and suffixes, then condense them down to usable forms, there will be a wider variety in the commonly used word forms. For this, I'm thinking about we way three different sharks might be referred to as "Great White", "Grey Nurse" or "Wobbegong", these are the commonly used terms in this part of the world, and the word shark isn't even added because it's simply implied. (Yes, "Wobbegong" is an appropriated native term, but I've already stated that this language will include some rules for appropriating terminology from other sources). 
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